Where to go whale watching in Sydney

Sydney's whale watching season runs from April to November and attracts thousands of visitors to the city each year. Here's a guide to the best ways to see the spectacular migration, with suggestions for viewing opportunities on and off the water...

Where to go whale watching in Sydney

Where to go whale watching in Sydney

About 20,000 whales escape the cold from Antarctica each year and migrate north along the Australian coast to warmer waters to feed and calve.

The migration is a sight to behold as these gentle giants swim, flip and roll. What’s the best way to see the whales? Here are some ideas on where to go whale watching in Sydney — on and off the water.

Sydney travel guide

Where to go whale watching in Sydney

Where to go whale watching in Sydney. Image courtesy of Oz Whale Watching

On the water

The closest views are, of course, only possible if you are on the water. If (like most of us) you don’t own a boat, there are plenty of whale watching cruises on offer in Sydney.

The price of whale watching tours and packages depends on many things: how long the whale watching cruise will be, what time of the day you’re going out and what’s included in the tour. Follow these tips to get the most out of your tour:

Book an afternoon cruise

You’ll notice that cruise rates are often cheaper in the morning. That’s because there are generally less sightings. Try and book an afternoon cruise. As the water warms up there’s a higher probability of seeing whales.

Book a Sydney whale watching cruise with lunch

Where to go whale watching in Sydney

Where to go whale watching in Sydney. Image courtesy of Oz Whale Watching

Look for tours offering guaranteed sightings

Different companies have different policies on this. Be sure to check how their guarantees work.

Spend more time on the water

The longer you are out there, the better your chances of seeing a spectacular show. So opt for a cruise that maximises your time on the water.

Where to go whale watching in Sydney

Where to go whale watching in Sydney. Image courtesy of Oz Whale Watching

Take a tour in spring

It’s okay to go whale watching in winter, but it’s better to do it in spring. That’s when baby whales are born. In calmer waters you may get to see mothers feeding their calves.

Make sure there’s a qualified expert on board

Many companies will have an expert on board to provide background information and commentary on the whales sighted on the tour. Check with the company when you book.

Where to go whale watching in Sydney

Where to go whale watching in Sydney. Image: Bigstock

Off the water

Not really up for an adventure on the high seas? Here are four spots suggested by the Office of Environment & Heritage for off-water whale watching in Sydney:

Bare Island Fort

Bare Island Fort is located in La Perouse, about 16 km south-east of the Sydney CBD (close to the northern headland of Botany Bay). The Fort offers a scenic view of the ocean, which is perfect for whale watching.

Bare Island Fort is open for tours every Sunday. You’ll have to walk 200 metres or so to get to the island by bridge.

Where to go whale watching in Sydney

Where to go whale watching in Sydney: Bare Island

Cape Solander

The lookout at Cape Solander has been created specifically for whale watching and has always been regarded as one of the best whale watching locations around Sydney. Spectators can see the whales swimming as close as 200 metres from the coast.

There’s a viewing deck and information about the different types of whales you may see.

Where to go whale watching in Sydney

Where to go whale watching in Sydney: Cape Solander

Muru and Yena Tracks

An hour or so walk along the Muru and Yena tracks from the Kurnell Visitor Centre will bring you to the cliffs overlooking the Pacific Ocean. From here, there’s a good chance you’ll see whales doing their thing.

Take a detour along the Banks-Solander track, where you’ll see a variety of plant species you won’t see anywhere else in Sydney.

Cape Baily Coastal Walk

Feeling adventurous? Try this two and a half hour walk along the cliff tops of Kurnell’s Kamay Botany Bay National Park. Even if you don’t see any whales, you’ll definitely see beautiful wildflowers in spring and a diverse range of other wildlife, including sea eagles, kestrels and terns.

Oz Whale Watching provided this post, which was edited by The Big Bus tour and travel guide. 

Additional images: Bigstock

 

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