Only got a couple of days to get to know a new city? Our Big Five City Guides can help. We break each destination down into culture, history, dining, shopping and relaxation must-sees and dos. Barry Johnson checks in from New Orleans - the Queen of the USA's Deep South...


New Orleans – or ‘Nola’ as she’s also known – means Mardi Gras, but this city has so much more to offer travellers.

The French Quarter – the neighbourhood that time forgot, the grand paddle-steamers that still ply the mighty Mississippi, the spicy flavours of Cajun and Creole cooking, and the eternal mysteries of the city’s above ground crypts and graves are all waiting to be experienced.

Enjoy this New Orleans travel guide.

New Orleans travel guide

New Orleans travel guide

History

New Orleans transcends the youth of the ‘New World’, and feels much more like the timeless European cities of Paris, Venice and London.

The French Quarter is a mind-blowing chance to step back in time and there are treasures to be discovered around every corner. Peel back the layers and learn of the folklore hidden in the cobble-stone streets with the help of a guide from Friends of the Cabildo. All proceeds from these walking tours go towards the work of the Louisiana State Museum.

New Orleans travel guide

New Orleans travel guide: St. Louis Cathedral

Our guide Stephanie describes the city’s dark history – destruction by fire and outbreaks of disease – believed by some to have come from a curse on a city built over a Native American burial ground. It’s no wonder New Orleans has long inspired tales of vampires and voodoo, and continues to fuel murder mysteries, crime thrillers and the latest CSI incarnation!

Culture

New Orleans’ cultural attractions are many and varied.

This is the birthplace of jazz and a jam session at Preservation Hall is a must-see during your visit. The raw energy, creativity and soul on display nightly will captivate you – whatever your feelings about the virtues of ad lib. Jazz lovers should consider visiting the city during the annual New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. The festival began back in 1970, and continues to celebrate the city’s musical heritage with gusto.

New Orleans travel guide

Music lovers of all ages enjoy the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. Image: Bigstock

Pay a visit to the Backstreet Cultural Museum to marvel at the flamboyant Mardi Gras costumes. If you are able to time your visit for the Mardi Gras festival (which is usually held in February), you’ll witness the legendary celebration that takes over the town. It’s a heady mix of parades, parties, elaborate masks and shiny beads (throws) tossed into the crowds by performers.

Listen to a podcast of our tips for top things to do in New Orleans:

Wind down in an 18th century pirates’ den – Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar – for a voodoo ice cocktail and shanty by the piano. Look out for the bullet holes in the walls, a remnant of pirate Jean Lafitte’s battles with the British (and anyone else who crossed his path)!

New Orleans travel guide

New Orleans travel guide: Enjoy the colour and spectacle of the Mardi Gras festival.

Dining

Forget the American clichés of hamburgers, hot dogs and apple pie; while in Louisiana, you’ll enjoy mouth-watering Creole and Cajun flavours.

For the tastiest of things to do in New Orleans, the guides from Free Tours by Foot give a great introduction to the French Quarter’s foodie culture, where you’ll sample po’ boy sandwiches (French baguettes stuffed with prawns, crab or crawfish) and jambalaya (a spicy chorizo, chicken and rice dish). Finish with sweet treats – beignets (moreish French doughnuts) and a chicory-blended café au lait.

New Orleans travel guide

New Orleans travel guide: Cajun jambalaya. Image: Bigstock

For a southern-style barbeque, The Joint has belt-busting portions of ribs, pulled pork, brisket and all the ‘fixins’. Take a trolley-car further afield to Jacques-Imo’s for blackened redfish and a dish that would’ve bitten back – alligator cheesecake with fried green tomatoes.

Shopping

You can continue to savour the flavours of New Orleans when you get home.

Visit the Pepper Palace and stock up on essential Cajun and Creole spices. The tabasco jelly beans pack quite a punch!

The crazily colourful t-shirts and art works on offer at the Jamie Hayes Gallery beat the usual touristy knickknacks hands down.

New Orleans travel guide

New Orleans travel guide. Image courtesy of Jamie Hayes Gallery

To vamp up your wardrobe, visit the Boutique du Vampyer for goth-inspired clothing and accessories, before getting your palm read by Saint-Germain. Or haggle with the city’s inhabitants at the Jackson Square market, over antique and dusty tomes, trinkets and baubles, some still glowing with the centuries-old magic of this mysterious city.

Relaxation

There are lots of things to do in New Orleans that will leave you feeling refreshed and revitalised.

Built as a port on the banks of the Mississippi River, New Orleans offers plenty of options for enjoying the water. Airboat rides are an exhilarating way to get up close and personal with the wildlife of the bayou – alligators, snakes and turtles to name a few.

For something a little more sedate, the Audubon Nature Institute offers leisurely walks through peaceful gardens. There’s a replica swamp with scheduled feedings of the locals.

New Orleans travel guide

New Orleans travel guide: Steamboat Natchez. Image: Bigstock

Travel like Mark Twain on the charming Steamboat Natchez. You’ll enjoy a buffet dinner, with a jazz band to serenade you – ‘watchin’ the tide roll away’.

If you prefer to catch your dinner, join Captain Ed on a fishing charter in search of trout or bass – cooked as you watch the sun set after another lazy day in ol’ Big Easy.

Five tours we love

New Orleans City Tour

This three-hour adventure goes well beyond the typical city tour experience – you’ll see and feel New Orleans just like a local! This is a fabulous introduction to the history, culture and architecture of one of the world’s most intriguing cities.

New Orleans Food Walking Tour of the French Quarter

We’ve told you how good the food is in New Orleans. Now find out exactly what all the fuss is about on this half-day food tour of the French Quarter. Visit famous eateries and sample local specialties like red beans and rice, chargrilled oysters and freshly baked beignets. You’ll also pick up plenty of tips on culinary hotspots to try during your stay.

New Orleans travel guide

New Orleans travel guide: Try freshly baked beignets. Image: Bigstock

New Orleans Cooking Class

Take your culinary journey a step further with a cooking class at the New Orleans School of Cooking. You’ll learn the basic principles of Louisiana home cooking, including how to whip up classic New Orleans dishes like gumbo and jambalaya.

Steamboat Natchez Jazz Dinner Cruise

Experience the true beauty and romance of life on the Mississippi River on board the Steamboat Natchez. Cruise the Mississippi from New Orleans while enjoying live jazz, a buffet dinner and stunning views. This authentic paddle-wheel steamboat is one of just a handful still operating on the Mississippi.

New Orleans Cemetery and Voodoo Walking Tour

Take a tour of one of the city’s most haunted cemeteries – St Louis Cemetery No. 1 – and pay a visit to the final resting place of the Voodoo Queen of New Orleans herself – Marie Laveau!

Do you have any tips to add to our New Orleans travel guide? We would love to hear from you. Please send us a message.

Additional images: Bigstock

 

Barry Johnson

About the writer

Barry Johnson is a freelance writer living in Sydney, but with a trail of Aussie souvenirs scattered throughout previous homes in Europe, America, Asia and the Middle East. Barry believes travelling is an adventure where the highlights push you onto the next trip and the lowlights can be laughed at with hindsight. Without a passport, he’d have missed getting lost in the Californian forest a week after the Blair Witch Project went viral, building a giant Buddha on a Cambodian mountain, camel racing in an Egyptian desert and teaching English to Peruvian children as they taught him Quechua, the language of the Incas.


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